Meet the Coach: Jake Hayden Helps Make February Heart Month at TNCS!

At The New Century School, students show heart every day by being kind to one another and the greater community and showing respect. February is a chance to emphasize kindness and compassion with Valentine’s Day looming, and, across the school, initiatives are coalescing into a big service push (more on that next week). But February is “❤️” month in another sense of the word as well in that it presents an opportunity to focus on heart health, the cardiovascular kind.

Meet Coach Jake!

Jake Hayden’s main gig is with Coppermine Fieldhouse, with whom TNCS has had a long and fruitful partnership. For Coppermine Fieldhouse, in addition to teaching physical education (PE) at TNCS, he has run recess at area schools like Hampstead Hill Academy and Ohr Chadash and taught “Lil’ Kickers” soccer classes on Saturdays. He is currently coaching more lacrosse classes, including player development classes for club lacrosse and “laxaroo” classes at Coppermine, which is lacrosse for 4- and 5-year-olds. “I just love those,” he says. “At that age, they are just learning how to pick up a stick. I love teaching kids the basics because I get to see if they really like it or not.” He also runs lacrosse scrimmage at Coppermine as well as refereeing flag football on Saturdays.

IMG_4031 copy

Sounds like a lot of sports! He comes by his athleticism honestly. Originally from Calvert County, he grew up with with three older brothers and an older sister, and family life, he says, revolved around sports and athletics. In high school and on, his sports foci were lacrosse, soccer, and basketball. After high school, he attended division III Ferrum College for lacrosse (go Panthers!), then transferred to Salisbury University for mathematics. So, it all adds up, right?

Coach Jake at TNCS

Back to what Coach Jake does at TNCS, he teaches four PE classes each Friday on campus: 5th- /6th-graders, 7th- /8th-graders, K/1st, and 2nd- through 4th-graders in that order. Clearly differentiation is necessary, but the overall theme is developing age-appropriate gross physical skills. “For the older classes,” explains Coach Jake:

I like to focus more on the individual skills involved in playing whatever game or sport we are playing that particular day. For the little ones, I usually have them focus on basic hand-eye coordination and balance while running. Most of their games (tag, relay race games, and obstacle courses) involve mostly running. Of course, my main emphasis for all classes is that we play the games the right way, the safe way, and have fun in the process.

Coach Jake also has to be ready to adapt each class, depending on what’s going on at school. “With specific units/sports in mind I encounter every class with the same diagnosis. How many kids are in the class that day, are we inside or outside, questions like that. From there I decide if my original game plan will work or if I have to switch it up and wing it.”

During the past wet Friday, for example, PE class had to be held indoors, but half of the gym was occupied by the Scholastic Book Fair. Thinking on his feet, Coach Jake salvaged the day, and students played games (with cleverly built in skills cultivation) in the back half of the gym. They were moving almost nonstop, getting that cardio workout in, but they were so into the game that they probably never noticed their increased heart rate!

One popular indoor game they play is “Body Guard Dodgeball,” in which ball throwers attempt to (gently—and no aiming for faces) hit a “celebrity” who is being blocked by a body guard (who ends up taking most of the hits). Everyone got a turn, and the action intensified as the rounds progressed.

Next up was a spin on relay races in which the object was to create the highest non-toppling stack of Imagination Playground foam pieces. It quickly became clear that the 5th- and 6th-graders had aged out (or up, as the case may be) of this one!

In Obstacle Course Tag (a game without an official name because TNCS students made it up), obstacles (again made of Imagination Playground foam) are stacked around the gym, and players have to avoid both being tagged by who’s “it” as well as avoid knocking over any obstacles. Either infraction gets you out!

“I particularly love teaching at TNCS,” said Coach Jake, “because I enjoy each and every student from all classes. The kids respond to instruction and are also fun kids to be around. Sometimes it does not feel like work. Compared to past job settings, TNCS is an all around pleasure to work at.”

IMG_3005

What’s Coach Jake’s Game Plan?

For the future, Coach Jake says, “I plan on coaching for as long as I can, whether it grows to be my career or slowly becomes a hobby. My big dream is to become a college lacrosse coach, although it is a rather difficult job to get.”

Although he is not currently on a sports team, he would like to join a men’s lacrosse league. “In the hotbed area of Baltimore,” he says, “the passion for lacrosse is abundant.” Lax to the max, Coach Jake!

Team TNCS: The Race Is On!

While we are still on the subject of cardiovascular health, let’s look at some other ways TNCS is embracing heart month. TNCS students get PE twice weekly, and only one of those classes is led by Coach Jake. The other PE class is teacher led, and Upper Elementary and Middle School ELA and Global Studies teacher Daphnée Hope has taken this opportunity and run with it! You may have heard that since the fall, Ms. Hope has been getting the older students out on weekly jogs—and they love it! “I was so excited to introduce running into our PE curriculum because I believe that it provides multiple benefits to both our students and staff,” she explained. “Running instills discipline, creates endorphins, and builds camaraderie between students and their teachers.”

I also believe in the power of leading by example for my students—when I am running right alongside them and pushing myself mentally and physically as well, I think they are more likely to buy into the conversations that we have about positive physical, mental, and social-emotional health.

IMG_3892 copy

Well said. And off they go for a mile or so run around the Fell’s Point neighborhood. They are building up stamina to eventually run the Sole of the City 10K this April (participation is optional).

The bottom line is, during the month of February, TNCS students are showing their hearts some love.

#HealthyHearts

Internet Safety Assembly at TNCS

The New Century School takes the health and safety of every member of its community very seriously.

As part of an ongoing Quarter 4 Health and Safety unit for upper elementary and middle school students, TNCS Head of School Alicia Danyali hosted a special assembly on May 2nd to talk about safe practices to use while online. “This week we are starting to look at different topics related to all the tools you need as students as you continue to develop and grow,” she explained. As is becoming more and more evident, the risks of unsafe cyber practices include identity theft and various forms of exploitation, among others. Teaching children how to safeguard themselves in the digital realm is therefore critical.

Building Cyber Awareness

To start off the discussion, Mrs. Danyali asked students to fill out a questionnaire about their Internet and computer use: “This is not going to be shared with anyone else, but it’s very important we have this conversation. If you don’t know how to answer something, skip that question. Try to answer honestly, and remember that there are no right or wrong answers here. Also, do not put your names on this survey; we are keeping this anonymous.”

The survey came from the Institute for Responsible Online and Cellphone Communication, known more familiarly as IROC2.org. This organization’s mission is to “. . . [communicate] a necessary Digital Consciousness™ that serves as the foundation for a uniform and proactive solution to any digital issue. The Institute is an ambassador to Digital Enlightenment™, and desires to construct a global digital community free of negative and sometimes irreversible consequences resulting from poor digital judgment.”

tncs-internet-safetyThe survey is quantitative, with a lower score correlating to less risky online behavior and practices. Mrs. Danyali explained the scoring system, and students tallied their results.

As you become more dependent on digital technology—you probably can’t avoid it, neither for personal nor for school life—we need to learn about digital safety and being consciously aware of what that means. It is probably unrealistic for any one of us to maintain a score of 0 our whole lives, but if you fell into the category of 0–30, you are using your digital tools and technology responsibly.

She then gently explained that a higher score might indicate a need to be more conscious of online behavior. “We’ll continue to talk about what all this means, but everyone should make sure you are changing your passwords regularly and that you are only visiting websites your parents have approved.”

The group then talked about the concept of a digital footprint with students defining that as what other people can see of their online presence. Mrs. Danyali then closed the discussion by reiterating her basic message: “This is a very important life skill. We can’t get away from technology, but we can choose to use it responsibly at school and at home. This conservation we’re starting is about how to manage technology and make conscientious choices. We’re talking about healthy habits so you stay safe. We’re here to learn and support each other.”

How Can You Get in on the Discussion?

If you would like to see the questionnaire in its entirety and/or assess your own cyber risk, visit: http://www.iroc2.org/CyberSafetyRiskAssessment.html.

It’s a good idea to revisit these topics at home with your children. For one thing, you’ll want to understand what their online habits are and explain any needed adjustments. Secondly, these topics are complex, and some students may not have completely understood what they were being asked. In order to respect students’ privacy, the discussion and Q&A held at TNCS was general in nature—again, everything was kept completely anonymous. Addressing individual questions, however, can and should be done safely at home.

For a free 28-page Digital Guide for parents in pdf form to help jumpstart the conversation, click here: https://www.iroc2.org/149.html.

TNCS School Lunch Program Gets a Refresh!

You may have noticed that The New Century School has been cooking up some fun changes for the 2017–2018 school year. One such change is happening in the the kitchen, where two new faces have appeared. With former chef Emma Novashinski* moving on to embark on a new professional chapter, TNCS school lunch has been taken over by veteran TNCS parents Danielle and John Moomau. Kibnesh Anebo, who assisted Chef Emma, now takes on the role of Lead Cook. (Click Garden Tuck Shop and Lunch Goes Global to read about the origins of TNCS school lunch.)

tncs-school-lunch-gets-refresh

Team School Lunch: Danielle, left; Kibnesh, middle; John, right.

Their kitchen takeover came to pass over the summer, when TNCS Co-Executive Director and Co-Founder Roberta Faux asked the Moomaus to consider assuming the role of kitchen manager. “At first we thought it would be impossible,” said Mrs. Moomau. “Considering that we operate our own full time food safety training and consulting business, how could we do the job of Chef Emma?” In fact, their proposed role would take a different shape. “Kitchen manager includes creating menus, overseeing production, maintaining regulatory compliance, food safety, inventory, and ordering,” she explained. With Ms. Anebo as Lead Cook and an additional new hire to assist with prep and clean-up coming on board, they realized they could manage. “And the idea of being able to engage more with our daughter, connecting with her classmates, all the teachers, administration, and other parents was appealing as well,” said Mrs. Moomau.

Wth a combined experience of over 50 years in retail food management, the Moomaus were a natural choice. “John and I both put ourselves through college working in the restaurant industry, working every position in the restaurant from dishwasher to bartender, and later working nationally doing multi-unit openings, culinary training, and finally regional operations.” They even met while working in the food-service industry. Mrs. Moomau is originally from New Orleans, and Mr. Moomau is from Silver Spring, MD, but they co-managed a restaurant in Washington, D.C. located at 14th NW and F Streets in 2003.

Then, in 2006, they left the corporate industry to start QRS Training, their own food consulting and training company, which offers classes and certification programs for food and alcohol licenses in the Mid-Atlantic region.

IMG_7875

Kibnesh prepares sesame noodles with faux chicken.

Now, 11 years later, they are bringing all of their expertise to TNCS students! The Moomaus are responsible for all food inventory and ordering of any supplies needed to run a smooth kitchen. They will oversee daily quantity of lunches needed and turn over the production line to head cook Ms. Anebo. Said Mrs. Moomau: “A local and clean path had been taken on by former TNCS Chef Emma and the founders of the school from the beginning when creating the lunch program. We seek to continue this and implement ways to influence the children with more international foods, but foods they will eat because it’s colorful, delicious, and fun.”

Although school lunch has a slightly new “flavor,” by far, most aspects of the program will stay the same. Mrs. Moomau explains:

Chef Emma started the school lunch with a different perspective. Understanding that she had to be compliant with the Maryland State Board of Education, which requires a protein, vegetable, fruit, and grain, she created menu’s that were colorful and different than what traditional school lunch programs offer. Keeping with TNCS’s promise to parents and students to be vegetarian and nut free, she researched and created lunches that offered children a new palette of flavors: soy nuggets that look and taste like chicken nuggets, colorful micro greens, and vegetables that the children planted and cultivated in TNCS’s own school garden. She got the kids excited and involved about the food they were eating. We wouldn’t change that piece of the program. Changes to the menu, however, will come as we get to know the children more and their likes and dislikes. But, whenever we introduce a new menu item, we promise to keep it delicious, healthy, fresh, and fun.

These menu adjustments have already started appearing in the form of food themes corresponding to each day of the week: American Mondays, Latin Tuesdays, Pasta Wednesdays, Asian Thursdays, and the already infamous and popular Pizza Fridays.They are trying new twists within these themes, too, such as avocado and cream cheese sushi rolls. “We don’t want to offer the children food that they don’t like, but we also want them to eat healthy, well-balanced, and low-sugar meals. So, we will continue to offer plenty of fruits and veggies that can be dipped into yogurts, hummus, guacamole. The children love to eat food with their hands, and dips are some of their favorites,” said Mrs. Moomau.

Screen Shot 2017-09-18 at 8.21.44 AM

Keepin’ It Clean and Green!

tncs-school-lunch-gets-refresh

Monica is making strawberry-blueberry parfaits.

Other ways that the Moomaus are ensuring continuity with the lunch program include continuing to order from food vendors who supply organic, fresh local produce, whenever possible; non-GMO ingredients; and no artificial coloring. “We’ve been establishing a clear expectation with our food providers that we want ‘clean and green’ food for our school,” they explained.

Of course, with any new venture, adaptations are inevitable. As before, one thing the new kitchen team wants to ensure is that the children they are feeding are eating. “We watch what goes into the trash everyday,” said Mrs. Moomau. “We approach the menu with the children’s perspective first. For example, today was ‘Asian Thursday’ and we offered Sesame Noodles, but our first thought was, the kids probably won’t favor rice noodles, so we’ll make the dish with an American twist and substitute whole-wheat, fat spaghetti noodles. It was a hit!”

Acclimating to the role might have been another challenge, but the Moomaus have found that support from the school administration has enabled them to surmount would-be obstacles:

Ms. Faux is so flexible and understanding that it makes the transitional period a lot less stressful. She has a solution for almost anything. When the founder of the school tells you, ‘don’t worry, if we absolutely have to, we can always order pizza,’ you know it’s going to go very well. And, although the first 3 weeks have had some bumps and learning curves, we’ve managed to get through without having to order pizza delivery!

They had this to say in closing: “We strive to do what’s right for our children and to make decisions that benefit their health.” And, let’s be honest, since kids like simple food and love to eat with their hands, dipping veggies in ranch or tortilla chips in guacamole or bean dip, for example, are not only kid favorites but are packed with vital nutrients.”

*Wondering how Chef Emma’s doing? She, too, has new adventures to share, and Immersed will keep you informed. Here’s a teaser: Emma’s Tea Spot will be opening in Hamilton soon . . .

Hungry Harvest Comes to TNCS!

Last month, The New Century School joined the Hungry Harvest family, a move that aligns with two very important TNCS values. The first is offering students clean, healthy food for lunch, the second, serving our larger community.

unspecified
In case you haven’t heard, Hungry Harvest is the phenomenal local company whose tagline, “Produce with a Purpose,” provides just an inkling of all that this force of social and environmental good really does. Not only do they obtain surplus produce and/or “recover” produce deemed not aesthetically pleasing enough to be sold in stores, which cuts down on food waste considerably, but they also donate 2 pounds of produce to help feed someone in need for every delivery they make. Moreover, they partner with local farms to obtain the “harvests” in another important synergy: The farms’ sustainable practices protect the environment, while being able to sell all of their viable produce (not just the visually perfect stuff) allows the farms to stay in business—and in an environmentally and socially conscious way.

Some Sad Facts

To put this in perspective, in many areas in the United States, but certainly here in Baltimore, which has the astronomic “food insecurity” rate of 23% of the population, we are faced with the tragic irony of wasting literally tons of food each year while people who could have eaten that food instead go hungry. Brace yourself. In July 2016, The Atlantic journalist Adam Chandler wrote:

Americans waste an unfathomable amount of food. In fact . . . roughly 50 percent of all produce in the United States is thrown away—some 60 million tons (or $160 billion) worth of produce annually, an amount constituting ‘one third of all foodstuffs.’ Wasted food is also the single biggest occupant in American landfills, the Environmental Protection Agency has found. . . the great American squandering of produce appears to be a cultural dynamic as well, enabled in large part by a national obsession with the aesthetic quality of food. Fruits and vegetables, in addition to generally being healthful, have a tendency to bruise, brown, wilt, oxidize, ding, or discolor and that is apparently something American shoppers will not abide. ‘Vast quantities of fresh produce grown in the U.S. are left in the field to rot, fed to livestock, or hauled directly from the field to landfill, because of unrealistic and unyielding cosmetic standards.’

(See more heartbreakingly unfortunate statistics on food waste here: https://www.usda.gov/oce/foodwaste/faqs.htm.)

unspecified-1TNCS Goes Hungry! (Harvesting, That Is.)

Fortunately, a very smart person recognized that these two problems could quite neatly solve each other. Quoting from the Hungry Harvest website, “Evan Lutz founded Hungry Harvest in the basement of his University of Maryland dorm room in 2014. He began by packing bags of produce himself and delivering to 30 customers. A few months later, Evan’s idea was validated on [the television show] ‘Shark Tank’ when he struck a deal with Robert Herjavec. Now the Hungry Harvest team is up to 11 and delivering across Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.”

Thanks to Head of School Alicia Danyali and Executive Chef Emma Novashinski, TNCS is now part of that delivery route. Said Chef Emma: “Hungry Harvest reclaims food rejected during quality assurance, sells it to subscribers, and uses some of the profit to feed other hungry families. We wanted to be part of this wonderful initiative that uses one problem to solve another.”

Although combination boxes of fruits and veggies are available, TNCS sticks with just fruit through Hungry Harvest. As Chef Emma explained it, seasonal fruit is harder to obtain throughout the year from local suppliers, whereas, in this climate, vegetables of some variety are always growing. So, even if local fruit isn’t always available, such as during winter months, TNCS can get it from Hungry Harvest. And, by ordering only organic through Hungry Harvest, there’s still a nod to sustainable practices. This also allows TNCS to avoid resorting to so-called “conventional fruit,” meaning fruit that might be shipped from a remote region or grown in heavily chemical environments.

“Every Monday, we get four boxes of fruit variety delivered to us, which has allowed us to start serving fruit salads, which the kids are not only really enjoying, but they are also tasting fruits they might have been unfamiliar with, such as pomegranates or persimmons. And, if there’s a fruit in the salad they don’t care for, they can eat the other fruits around it and still get the vitamins and nutrients. Today we had mango, strawberry, and melon, for example.” Last year, Chef Emma more or less had to rotate apples and oranges through the winter months. This year, “we get a crossfade. They get to experience some new things—satsumas, mandarins, pineapples—and they get some old favorites like clementines,” she said. “They are getting more fruit this way, too, which can’t be bad. There’s no peel or pith—it’s already in bite-sized pieces for them.” (By the way, the persimmons were sweetened and cooked down then mixed with Greek yogurt in case you were wondering how on earth Chef Emma got the kids to eat them! Which they did!)

Choose-your-own-adventure options are available, but TNCS lets Hungry Harvest select what fruit will be delivered and provides guidelines for what works, such as no highly perishable items, so single items, etc.

Surely the question on everybody’s minds by now is, “So what about the quality?” In Chef Emma’s experience so far, the produce has been completely edible and delicious, rejected only for visual imperfections such as shape or markings. It’s not soft or mushy, as might be the misconception.

But wait—there are even more great benefits deriving from this partnership! In an online chat, Hungry Harvest Customer Experience Hero & Academic Coordinator Katie Landry explained:

Our school pickup sites operate a really unique program called Produce in a SNAP that allows families in need to use their SNAP/EBT (Food Stamps). We currently partner with Baltimore City Public and Charter schools to subsidize our produce and they can use SNAP/EBT at these sites! Learn more about these sites by following the link below.

Hungry for More?

If you are interested in signing up for a harvest for your family, visit https://shop.hungryharvest.net/summary.php?go=products to see the goods. It couldn’t be easier to do, and you’ll not only be making a social impact and contributing to environmental sustainability, you’ll also have your family’s fruits and veggies conveniently delivered to your door! The online signup experience is a breeze, and super-friendly company representatives like Katie are available to answer any questions in an instant. (And they address you as a hero, so that’s added fun :).)

Pro Tip: Typing “Emma Novashinski” in the referral box earns you a discount as well as one for TNCS! Go reap your harvest!

Immersed’s Bicentennial!

tncs-imersed-bicentennialDear readers and members of The New Century School community, Immersed is happy to herewith arrive at Post #200! (Cue the fireworks!)

To commemorate this achievement, we give you all 199 prior posts, starting with the most recent and ending with Immersed’s very first post on October 12, 2012. Please enjoy this look at how Immersed (and TNCS) have evolved together over the years!

199. Taking Time Out for Peace at TNCS

198. TNCS Hosts a Special 10th-Anniversary Back-to-School Night!

197. TNCS Exemplifies Four Core values

196. Belaboring Labor Day: Two Schools of Thought

195. TNCS Summer Theatre Camp 2016: A Week of Wonder

194. TNCS Camp Invention 2016 is Epic!

193. TNCS Chinese Summer Camp: Promoting Healthy Lifestyles and Happy Campers!

192. Kids Brush Up on Creativity at TNCS

191. Summer Camp with the Painting Workshop!

190. Kids Get It Together at TNCS Lego Camp!

189. TNCS Spanish Immersion Camp Gets Kids Hablar*!

188. Hit the Ground Learning in Summer 2016 with TNCS-Approved Resources

187. Goodbye 2015–2016 School Year! It’s Been Great!

186. TNCS Upper Elementary Bond in the Great Outdoors!

185. TNCS Elementary Attends Healthy Harbor 2015 Report Card Release!

184. TNCS Teachers and Admin Share School Memories, Part 2

183. TNCS Upper Elementary Treads the Boards!

182. TNCS Teachers and Admin Share School Memories

181. TNCS Hosts Education Conference for Teachers from China!

180. Multilingual Media for Kids: Explore Beyond Dora; Bid Kai-Lan Farewell!

179. Go Native for Earth Day 2016!

178. TNCS Elementary Engages in Conservation by the Barrel

177. Why You (Yes, You!) Should Consider Becoming a Host Family!

176. TNCS Science Fair 2016: It All Starts with a Good Question!

175. TNCS Teachers Get Mindful!

174. Guest Blog: Stop and Smell the Roses!

173. Meet the Art Teacher: A Portrait of Elisabeth Willis

172. TNCS Primary Workshop: Connecting Montessori to Home

171. “Keeping The Conversation Going” – In Multiple Languages!

170. TNCS Elementary Gets Positively Presidential!

169. TNCS Goes to the Grammys!

168. TNCS Celebrate the Chinese New Year!

167. TNCS Parent Workshop: Making the Transition from Pre-Primary to Primary

166. TNCS Elementary Walk Back Through History with Frederick Douglass!

165. Meet the Teachers: Wei Li and Yangyang Li!

164. Meet the Teacher: Kiley Stasch Joins TNCS Elementary!

163. Vote for Your Favorite Post of 2015

162. TNCS Middle School: Opening the Window of Awakening

161. TNCS Elementary Saves the Holidays!

160. Right from the Start: Talking with Elementary-Age Children about Sexuality

159. Meet the Teacher: Manuel Caceres

158. Lessons in Gratitude at TNCS

157. TNCS Visits Schools in China!

156. You are NOT human!

155. Go Outside and Get Dirty, Kids!

154. TNCS Honors Dia de los Muertos!

153. TNCS K/1st Classes Get to the Core of Apple-Harvesting!

152. Cutting Edge Skills at TNCS

151. The Most Important Partner: You!

150. TNCS Performs at Continental Bridge Celebration!

149. TNCS School Lunch Goes Global!

148. ColorCycling Comes to TNCS!

147. Councilman Kraft’s Fall Initiatives at TNCS

146. Guest Blog: Back-to-School Transitions

145. Back-to-School Traditions from Around the World!

144. Meet the Newest Addition to TNCS’s Administration!

143. STARTALK 2015 Campers Get a Taste of Taiwan!

142. TNCS-Approved Resources: Avoid the Summer Slide!

141. Help TNCS Support Pratt’s Summer Reading Program!

140. TNCS Elementary Attends Healthy Harbor Report Card Release!

139. TNCS Elementary Field Trip: A Natural Choice

138. TNCS Elementary Skypes with Students from other Countries!

137. TNCS Primary Students Have Something to Crow About!

136. Mindful Parenting: A TNCS Workshop that Could Change the World

135. Planet Uptune Debuts CD at Dunfest 2015!

134. Gilman School Seniors Visit TNCS for Some Spanish Fun!

133. TNCS Elementary Takes Earth Day by Storm!

132. TNCS’s Go-Green-for-Earth-Day Raffle!

131. Read-a-Thon Opens New Chapter for TNCS Outdoor Activities

130. How to Be an “Askable” Parent

129. TNCS Elementary Students Inform through Writing

128. TNCS STEM Fair 2015 Makes a Huge Splash!

127. TNCS’s Second Annual Town Hall

126. News for STARTALK at TNCS!

125. TNCS Primary Classes Jazz It Up!

124. TNCS Rings in the Year of the Sheep!

123. TNCS Students Discover Math-e-Magic!

122. Transitioning from Preprimary to Primary at TNCS

121. TNCS Welcomes DBFA and the “Big Kids”!

120. So What’s Bugging You?

119. Phys Ed Is Going Strong at TNCS!

118. Meet the Teacher: Montessori-Trained Maria Mosby Joins TNCS

117. Standardized Testing Debate Continues

116. Winter Break—It’s Not Just for Homework Anymore!

115. TNCS Elementary Information Night Rounds Out a Great 2014!

114. TNCS’s Winter Performance Amazes and Delights!

113. TNCS Launches New Website!

112. Lessons in Thanksgiving at TNCS

111. TNCS Elementary Needs Your Vote!

110. Meet the Teacher: Elementary STEM Instructor Dan McGonigal Joins TNCS

109. State-of-the-Science Elementary Writing Instruction at TNCS

108. TNCS Elementary Students to Enter BGE Video Contest!

107. Theatre Workshop Promotes Team-Building among TNCS Elementary Students

106. TNCS and Councilman Kraft: Outreach for Our Shared Community

105. Meet TNCS’s Newest Chinese Teachers!

104. TNCS Uses Viridian’s Power with Purpose!

103. TNCS Performs at Confucius Institute Day!

102. TNCS Students Get the Wiggles Out and the Learning In!

101. Back-to-School Night: Meet New TNCS Teachers and More!

100. Immersed’s Centennial!

99. It’s Good to Be Back at TNCS!

98. TNCS Gets Ready for School!

97. Camp Invention Takes Creativity to New Heights (and New Depths) at TNCS!

96. TNCS Knows Safe Urban Gardening!

95. Cooking and Gardening Camp at TNCS Is a Recipe for Fun!

94. STARTALK Is a Huge Success at TNCS!

93. TNCS Summer Camp Heats Up Under New Directorship

92. The Painting Workshop at TNCS: Kids Paint the Town!

91. TNCS Drama Camp Brings Out Kids’ Inner Artists

90. TNCS Summer “Move It!” Camp Gets Kids Moving and Learning!

89. Excitement and Creativity Build at TNCS Lego Camp!

88. TNCS “Pops” the Trash!

87. TNCS Elementary Sing in Mandarin in Command Performance!

86. STARTALK Shines at TNCS!

85. Best of Immersed: Reader Poll

84. Music Is in the Air at TNCS!

83. Community Conversation: Protecting Our Children

82. Baseball Fundraiser Scores Big for TNCS

81. Admissions Fridays: Your Ticket to Getting to Know TNCS!

80. Holidays at TNCS: How Do We Celebrate?

79. Meet the Big Kids with TNCS!

78. Cultivating a Growth Mindset at TNCS

77. Kids and Safety: When (If) to Let Go

76. TNCS Elementary Science Fair 2014!

75. TNCS Lower Elementary Goes Around the World in 80 Days

74. Making School Transitions: Pre-Primary to Primary at TNCS

73. See What’s Jumping at The Lingo Leap!

72. Cultural Diversity at TNCS: Insiders’ Perspectives

71. Year of the Horse Festivities Giddy-Up at TNCS

70. TNCS’s Foreign Language Program Embraces the 5 Cs

69. Spaceship Club Elevates Aftercare at TNCS!

68. TNCS’s Garden Tuck Shop Program Relaunches!

67. TNCS’s Inaugural Town Hall

66. TNCS Elementary Information Night: A School Grows and Flourishes

65. New Year’s Resolutions TNCS Style

64. TNCS Holiday Outreach Programs

63. TNCS Wins Southeast Baltimore City Schools Recycling Competition!

62. What Does Kindergarten Look Like at TNCS?

61. Volunteerism at TNCS

60. TNCS: A School to Be Thankful For

59. The ABCs of ZZZs at TNCS

58. Anxiety-Free Kids at TNCS

57. TNCS Gives Thanks by Giving Back

56. TNCS Makes Strides Against Breast Cancer

55. Pipa Concert at TNCS

54. Elementary Strength Training

53. Open House at TNCS

52. Happy Birthday, Immersed!

51. History of Our Beloved Buildings

50. STEM Teacher Arrives at TNCS!

49. TNCS Back-to-School Night

48. School Daze: Where to Educate City Kids?

47. A TNCS Original

46. Immersed Is Here!

45. Hack the Trash: Community Art Project

44. International Camp at TNCS

43. Making the Case for Cursive

42. Elementary Math and Reading Skills: Important Predictors of Successful Adulthood

41. Bagging Bagged Lettuce

40. Summertime Theatrics: Drama Camp at TNCS

39. And the Winner Is . . .

38. You Say Tomayto, I Say Tomahto

37. Adventures with One Straw Farm CSA

36. The New Century School: A Retrospective and Prospective Look

35. The Rename Game

34. Resources and Links Page for TNCS Families

33. Sanctuary Bodyworks: An Exercise Haven

32. Honoring Parenthood at The New Century School

31. Camp Invention Returns to TNCS in June

30. Strengthening Friendships, Creating Art: TNCS Welcomes Back Baltimore Love Project

29. Making Summer Count—Weekly Camps at TNCS

28. Touch Screens and Your Child: To App or Not To App

27. Breaking Down the GMO Issue: Some Earth Day Musings

26. Spring Break—a Noteworthy Topic

25. Community-supported Agriculture and TNCS

24. Elementary Science Fair!

23. Standardized Testing: It’s Time to Talk About It

22. Imagination Playground Comes to TNCS

21. Language, Math, and Science—Montessori Style!

20. Charmed by TNCS’s Year of the Snake Performance

19. Green Neighborhood Energy Challenge: TNCS Update

18. Preschool Conundrum Solved: Research Demonstrates Benefits of Montessori Education

17. Language Curriculum Specialist Joins TNCS

16. The Importance of Being Artistic

15. Multilingualism at TNCS: Optimizing Your Child’s Executive Function

14. TNCS Launches Green Neighborhood Energy Challenge

13. Achieving Balance in Education at TNCS

12. Giving Back: TNCS Kids and Heifer International

11. Elementary Program Merges Montessori and Progressive Education at The New Century School

10. Top 10 Reasons to Attend Montessori Kindergarten

Inside the Montessori Classroom

9. Exercising That Mind–Body Connection

8. Blown Away with Wind Energy

7. Getting the Education Nitty Gritty

6. Sustainable School Lunch: Garden Tuck Shop Program Part 2

5. Sustainable School Lunch: Garden Tuck Shop Program Part I

4. Baltimore Love Project

3. Kindness Counts!

2. International Walk-to-School Day

1. Hello World!