TNCS March Madness 2018!

A lot happens at The New Century School in the month of March—no brackets needed.

Here is your rundown of all the exciting academic events that TNCS students have been participating in!

Spelling Bee!

On March 7th, TNCS held its first annual spelling bee competition, that was open to 3rd-, 4th-, 5th-, 6th-, and 7th-graders, and participation was optional. The bee was divided into two cohorts: 3rd- through 5th-graders competing in one division and 6th- and 7th-graders in the second. will participate in a separate group. Organized by TNCS’s English Language Arts specialist, Ilia Madrazo, the bee was a fun and challenging competition, and TNCS students were thoroughly absorbed.

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Three prize categories were up for grabs: The first-place winner would be presented with a $10 gift card for the Ozone Café, second place a $5 gift card, and the third-place winner would get a well-earned “high five” from the panel of esteemed judges. Students were given word lists well in advance to practice from, but participants were also asked to spell words they had not previewed.

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The competition was stiff, and spelling went into far more rounds than the judges had been anticipating—a testament to how assiduously TNCS students prepared. Although each student was trying his or her hardest, the camaraderie among contestants was beautiful to see: Each speller got a high-five for successfully spelling a word or a kind word of support if a word took him or her down.

An example of a Round One word:

An example of a Round Two word:

. . . And so it went . . .

And then there were five (in the 3rd to 5th cohort)—all boys!

IMG_0123.JPGAfter about seven or so rounds, three students remained standing, and it was quite a cliff-hanger!

Ultimately, two students tied for first in the 3rd to 5th cohort, making five total winners, pictured below. Although sharing the actual word lists online is prohibited by copyright, we can tell you that the two tied for first in the 3rd to 5th cohort went through 12 total rounds, both ultimately choking on the word, “outrageous,” fittingly!

Here’s what the winners had to say about their achievements:

Said Mrs. Danyali: “There was so much pride and courage in the room as each participant did their very best. Great job to all!”

Women Heroes!

The day after the Spelling Bee, another first occurred—the TNCS Women Heroes Assembly, in honor of International Women’s Day. Elementary and Middle School girls gathered in the gymnasium for a circle with Head of School Alicia Danyali to talk about historical women figures who helped further women’s causes, what it was like to be a woman before women had certain rights, and to imagine their own futures and what they plan to contribute to the world.

Math Kangaroo!

Next up in this chock-full month was the second annual Math Kangaroo for Grades 1 through 7!

Stay tuned for more about how TNCS students fared this year against their national and international peers—the results are still pending. In the meantime, check out last year’s competition: Math Kangaroo 2017!

Science Fair!

IMG_0262Always a big deal at TNCS, the 2018 Science Fair was an unqualified success, as the slide show below attests! From engineering and mechanics to chemistry, physics, and biology to even the social sciences, TNCS kindergarten through 7th-graders conducted their experiments and then presented to parent audiences throughout the third week of March.

 

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Science guru Jon Wallace said, “When [TNCS students] enter high school, I think they are going to be ready to deal with high school sciences. The big drive this year was representing data. That’s something they are going to have to be very good at because when they get to 9th-grade biology, for example, they will be graphing data, whether it be a line graph, a bar graph, or whatever, and putting data into data tables, then interpreting that data.”

The top project for Mr. Wallace was Curly Hair versus Straight Hair: Light Absorption, which he found very interesting and unique. It’s a thoughtful question that even has evolutionary overtones—which type of hair allows for greater ultraviolet light penetration and is therefore less protective? “Mr. Wallace also appreciated the very engineering-oriented The Influence of Spoilers on the Downforce of Cars. “I feel like [that student] learned a whole lot about fluids through research about wing design. It’s neat to see kids get so into it.”

“I feel like overall we have gained something in being able to represent data. That was the main outcome I was looking for this year, in addition to following the Scientific Method, of course,” he said.

Project Linus!

Finally, On March 19th, just before the epic snowstorm of Spring 2018 hit and Spring Break ensued, TNCS 3rd- and 4th-graders completed a service learning project as part of the TNCS core value of Service. Other TNCS divisions will also be completing service projects as the second half of the academic year winds out.

For the second year running, 3rd- and 4th-graders spent an hour with Baltimore City/Baltimore County Chapter Coordinator Fay Husted, “Ms. Fay,” from Project Linus to learn how to make blankets for sick and hospitalized children in need. See details from last year’s project, TNCS’s first time with Project Linus and Ms. Fay, here: TNCS Continues Annual Service to the Community with Project Linus. This project is annually organized by the TNCS Parent Council, headed up by Sakina Ligon.

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The group was so motivated by the blanket-making that they ended up taking Mrs. Sharma’s Teacher’s Choice period to complete them that very day! See the beautiful results for yourself!

So there you have it. March blew in like a lion, and TNCS students roared with achievement, learning, spelling, calculating, doing, and helping!

TNCS Continues Annual Service to the Community with Project Linus

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Please drop off new or gently used coat donations to TNCS by December 12, 2016 in TNCS’s reception area.

The run up to the holiday season is always a special time at The New Century School because it’s an opportunity to show our support to our local community and beyond. In the month of November, TNCS has undertaken two outreach initiatives to benefit our neighbors in need, first with the 6th annual healthy food drive for Beans & Bread (through St. Vincent de Paul) in conjunction with United Way of Central Maryland, and second with the coat drive for CASA de Maryland, a nonprofit that works with low-income Latino immigrant families. Please note that this latter initiative is ongoing through December 12, 2016, and a donation box is located in TNCS’s reception area.

img_0089This year, though, is special for a new effort. On November 18th, as part of their Service learning, TNCS upper elementary and middle school students teamed up with Project Linus, a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide homemade blankets to sick and hospitalized children in need—to “provide security through blankets” and “spread blanket hugs nationwide.” Head of School Alicia Danyali and Parent Council Head Sakina Ligon both have experience with Project Linus and felt it was a great fit for TNCS.

Ms. Ligon explained in an email to parents that “volunteerism teaches basic character foundations to children, and having them help other children teaches them that people in need are really just like them. Studies have shown that serving as volunteers promotes healthy lifestyle and choices, enhances development, teaches life skills, promotes citizenship, improves the community, and encourages a lifelong service ethic in children ages 5 to 14 years. The value of volunteering teaches your children the importance of donating their time, a core value at TNCS.”

img_0084On the day TNCS students became “blanketeers,” a school tour group happened to be coming through and were duly impressed by the service-learning-in-action they witnessed. Baltimore City/Baltimore County Chapter Coordinator Fay Husted instructed the 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-graders on how to produce the blankets. Mrs. Hutchens was a teacher and principal in Baltimore City schools for 37 years and now devotes her time to Project Linus.

Said Mrs. Husted:

Project Linus us a national organization with chapters all over the country. Being a chapter coordinator means being very organized because hundreds of people make blankets for me—individuals as well as school, church, and senior groups. We accept quilts and fleece, knitted, and crocheted blankets. When we get the blankets to our storage facility, a group of about 10 ladies help me sew in handmade Project Linus labels. Once we get the labels in the blankets, I bag them, and my husband and I deliver them all over Baltimore City—mostly to hospitals, but also to Ronald McDonald House, Believe in Tomorrow Children’s House at Johns Hopkins, House of Ruth, shelters, and some camps. We deliver between 200 and 250 blankets a month.

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Fay Husted

Project Linus was established in Parker, Colorado on December 24, 1995 and has delivered more than 6 million blankets nationwide to grateful kids in the going-on 21 years since. “Project Linus is a wonderful organization. A non-profit is considered good if 13% or less of their donations are used for administrative purposes. Less than 7% of ours are,” explained Mrs. Husted, “because everybody is a volunteer.” Other than some monthly and annual maintenance fees, such as for the right to use Charles Schultz’s thumb-sucking, blanket-carrying, sage-beyond-his-years character as their mascot, they operate with very little overhead.

From dozens of available patterns, Mrs. Husted chose Fringed Fleece Blanket that can be made very quickly for TNCS students. Here’s how they did it!

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img_0106Said Mrs. Danyali, “the students are going to write notes of encouragement to go along with the blankets they make.” One fifth grader commented that she was very glad to participate in a project that would help kids in need. Another, with obvious sincerity, said he wanted to make his blanket as good as he possibly could.

With leftover material, students can make additional items like headbands during Teacher’s Choice time.

For past years’ initiatives, such as primary classrooms collecting dimes to purchase and donate livestock through Heifer International, see Lessons in Gratitude at TNCS, Lessons in Thanksgiving at TNCS, and TNCS Holiday Outreach Programs.

Meet Sakina Ligon: TNCS’s New Parent Council Head

The New Century School community had been moving toward establishing a Parent Council for a couple of years. Originally suggested during a TNCS Town Hall meeting, the Parent Council came together as a formal organization during the 2015–2016 school year. Since that time, the Parent Council has continued to develop its identity and hone its mission. A clear distinction is being made, for example, between Classroom Parents, who will act as communication conduits between teachers and parents, and Parent Council members who serve on a broader team in support of the school at large.

With the advent of the 2016–2017 school year, the Parent Council welcomed its new head, Sakina Ligon, who brings loads of both professional and personal experience to bear in her new position. Accepting the role, she said, allows her to get involved in a very direct way in her daughter’s first year at TNCS.

Brief Bio

Sakina Ligon is the Assistant Director of Student Life and an adjunct instructor with the Community College of Baltimore County. Having earned an M.S. in Higher Education Administration from Baruch College—The City University of New York, Ms. Ligon’s professional interests focus on student development and equitable access for all students.

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Sakina Ligon, Head of TNCS Parent Council (among many other things!)

In this capacity, she also serves as secretary for the National Council on Student Development and co-chair for the 2016 National Council on Student Development Conference, is a member of the Maryland Community College Association Directors Association, and serves as a mentor for Sister’s Circle™, a local non-profit dedicated to “[empowering] at-risk girls to define success for themselves, make intentional decisions about their futures, and become self-sufficient young women.”

Parent Council Goals and Initiatives

With Ms. Ligon now at the helm, the Parent Council has formalized its mission as well as specific goals for the 2016–2017 school year. They are committed to assisting the TNCS community with enriching the children’s experience by continuing to offer opportunities for their exploration, learning, and development. Their mission is:

  • To foster communication between all constituencies
  • To provide support to the teachers and administration
  • To assist with fundraising initiatives
  • To coordinate special school events to help enrich each student experience as well as subsidize the overall cost of the co-curricular experience

In support of these goals, so far this year the Parent Council has launched a LabelDaddy campaign that has not only at least temporarily retired the Lost & Found bin (because student belongings are clearly labeled—use promo code TNCS!), but also raises funds for the school, as well as the Harris Teeter fundraiser, Together in Education (TNCS can now earn a percentage of each purchase when TNCS families link their VIC cards and shop Harris Teeter brands using TNCS Code 3528).

Ms. Ligon says that an ancillary goal she hopes to pursue relates back to a TNCS Core Value—service. “We want to work on giving back not just to the school but also to the community in general,” she said. This involves both community events as well as service projects. Such initiatives the council will help the TNCS community tackle throughout this year are as follows.

  • Family Dance Night with the Charles Street Fiddlers on November 5th to support the second annual upper elementary trip to Echo Hill Outdoor School (read about last year’s here). See our Facebook event for more information: Family Dance Night.
  • Teacher Appreciation will take place during American Education Week (November 14th through 18th), with the theme that teachers are our real-life superheroes. Parent volunteers will be asked to help out on a teachers’ luncheon, and students will decorate the school and make goodie bags.
  • Project Linus: Provide love, a sense of security, warmth and comfort to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through the gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer “blanketeers.” Our blanketeers will be TNCS 3rd- through 6th-graders, collaborating on the “No-Sew Fleece Blanket” shown below.tncs-parent-council-initiative
  • Random Acts of Kindness: This initiative will target service from TNCS’s younger students and involves decorating bags and filling them with items that might brighten someone’s day.
  • Rice: “Most cultures use rice, and they each have particular ways to prepare and eat it,” said Ms. Ligon. So, during Sprit Week in February, the last day of the week will be a cultural day and could serve as a potluck, highlighting rice. Details to come!

In these ways, the new Parent Council adopts a three-pronged approach to much-needed school initiatives: fundraising, community events, and service. In closing, Ms. Ligon very rightly reminds us to stay involved. “I hope everyone will embrace the Parent Council. I’m happy to help out wherever I can, but it’s more than me—it has to be a collective effort,” she said. That collective effort will provide all manner of assistance to the school and to our local community. Importantly, it will also model community-oriented behavior for our kids, helping them to develop into the citizens this world needs.