Spring Break—a Noteworthy Topic

Author E.M. Forster once said, ““How do I know what I think until I see what I say?” and explained the purpose of expository writing in that simple handful of words. Constructing a piece of writing is to develop a thought, give it structure, and send it off into the world to see if it flies. Writing is thinking.

Spring Break 2

Written in cursive, this paragraph details a Spring Break full of fun things!

This Spring at The New Century School, the elementary students are trying their own hands at writing. They were given the assignment to write a paragraph on their Spring Break plans. Says elementary teacher Adriana DuPrau, “We are working on well-organized paragraphs in which sentences are about the same topic and organizing our thoughts around that topic.”

Spring Break 6

Lots of family time makes for a great vacation!

Students learned paragraph basics including starting off with topic sentences, adding supporting detail, and closing with wrap-up sentences that reiterate the main point of the paragraph but using slightly different wording. “We also worked on indenting the first line—something so simple, yet we forget it so often,” added Mrs. DuPrau.

Spring Break 3

Cherry blossoms and roller blading . . . sounds like a dream!

See for yourselves what TNCS 6–8-year-olds will be up to this week and whether they fulfilled the assignment requirements.

“Let me live, love and say it well in good sentences.”

                                                                      —Sylvia Plath

Looks like TNCS kids did just that!

3 thoughts on “Spring Break—a Noteworthy Topic

  1. Cursive, and writing in paragraphs, oh my, what’s next? It appeared that cursive was a lost art in today’s schools. It’s wonderful to see that your program includes this focus on the correct way of writing. My compliments on bringing back the correct way of writing and composition.

  2. I love the idea. I love that the children are writing in cursive.

  3. So proud of the young writers at New Century.

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